About Me

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My name is Anthony Lister, an electrical and renewable energy engineer. I’m due to start working at the amazing new research station at Halley Bay on the Brunt Ice Shelf in Antarctica in December 2013. I’ll be living and working in one of the most isolated places on the planet for two summers and one very, very long winter, including three months of darkness! I’ll be heading home midway through 2015.

Antarctica is the highest, the driest, coldest and windiest continent on planet earth and not exactly what you’d call hospitable to humans, it’s also one of the best places to conduct all sorts of scientific research and I’m lucky enough to be able to go.

Whilst there I’ll be keeping the base running, helping the scientists do their work and having the adventure of a lifetime.  And whilst I’m doing that I’ll be trying to document it all here!

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13 thoughts on “About Me

  1. What an amazing opportunity! As a Canadian melting away in Japan and eagerly awaiting the coming of winter, Antarctica sounds good! 🙂

  2. Hello Antony
    Looking forward to following your blog throughout your deployment to the ice.
    Your engineer’s perspective on the new Halley base should prove particularly interesting.
    Take care and sundry diverting hobby materials.
    Matt

  3. Intrigued by your opening statement: “Antarctica is the highest, the driest, coldest and windiest continent on planet earth” – driest, coldest, windiest not surprising, but highest???

    • Hi Ian, Antarctica is fairly mountainous, some of the peaks are visible as nunataks but most of the continent is covered by ice- in some places 5km thick, all in all the place is on average higher above sea level than the other continents. The ground at the South Pole is only about 100 meters above sea level but the ice sitting on it is nearly 3000 meters thick.

  4. Sky news said you were feeling chilly. I hope all is going well. H’fax is the home to former bog snorkelling champs. Have a nice day! Hoe much daylight are you getting these days?

    • HI Julia, had a loom at your blog- afraid you’ll just get a UK flag for my visit though! Anyone reading this should have a look and see if you can add to the flag map!
      Thanks for the message, things are on the up and I;m looking forward to the Sun coming back, the light is slowly increasing but it’s yet to actually get above the horizon.
      That little fact really doesn’t surprise me! Sounds like fun

      • Cheers for the “loom” ha ha…I will weave imaginary woollen hats and send them! I had never thought about the flag thing. Is there a flag for the Antarctic? Like the E.U.?
        Tell me also…how do you deal with time? Is it like the military? Are you on Zulu Time? Too many questions? My friend told me “Theres nothing as bad as half educated culchie” (a country bumpkin in Ireland 😀 )
        RE:Sunshine I spent some time in Lapland as an Elf. (as you do) I remember the upward beam of light on the horizon the day or two before the sun came up was cool too!
        Now back to work with you!
        Many Thanks!
        Ju

  5. Sky news said you were feeling chilly…I hope you are ok now!

  6. Hello Sir, this is Maitree from India. Well i have never been to antarctica, but my father was a part of the 7th Indian Expedition (1987-1989). Hence i always grew up with his stories from there. They have always excited me. I never came across someone bringing the life and the adventures so live like you have in your blog. Yes the video you posted is really so cool. I am sure it looks so cool in pictures and the videos but all this have come with lots of hardships. I have shown your blog to my father too, he is still reading the same and enjoying it. Loved the actual blood moon pictures too. And how can i miss those Auroras.
    I could not stop myself from writing it to you here, what an amazing way to show us Antarctica.
    Please keep writing more on your adventures.
    Thank you again for sshowing us Antarctica.

    • Thank you for your comment Maitree. I’m glad you enjoyed my tales of what I’ve been up to in Antcarctica. I bet your Father has some amazing tales! Lots of things are still the same down there – the weather and the beauty will always be the same of course but I’d imagine even though the late eighties was not too long ago your father had to deal with things I did not – no internet or blogs then! Much more isolated experience.

      I’m back in the UK right now getting on with living life in reality but I hope to be back in the ice soon!

      Thank you!

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